World Health Organization unanimously adopted the Global Health Strategy on Viral Hepatitis Print
Association news
Wednesday, 01 June 2016 06:46

WHO hepatitis 2016

On 28 May, 194 Member States made a historic commitment to eliminate viral hepatitis by 2030. At the 69th World Health Assembly, governments unanimously voted to adopt the first ever Global Viral Hepatitis Strategy, signalling the greatest global commitment in viral hepatitis to date. The Strategy sets a goal of eliminating hepatitis B and C by 2030 and includes a set of prevention and treatment targets which, if reached, will reduce annual deaths by 65% and increase treatment to 80%, saving 7.1 million lives globally by 2030.




Worldwide viral hepatitis kills 1.4 million people every year – more than HIV or malaria, and are among the leading causes of liver cirrhosis and cancer. With vaccines and effective treatments for hepatitis B and a cure for hepatitis C available, the targets outlined in the strategy are feasible and eliminating hepatitis by 2030 is achievable.
“The adoption of WHO Viral Hepatitis Strategy signals the first step in eliminating viral hepatitis, an illness which affects 400 million worldwide. We congratulate governments for showing great ambition. ” Raquel Peck, CEO of the World Hepatitis Alliance said. “If governments remain committed, we will witness one of the greatest global health threats eliminated within our lifetimes.”
Although the adoption of the strategy demonstrates considerable political will, more work will be needed to make the elimination of viral hepatitis a reality. As of February 2016, 36 countries had viral hepatitis national plans in place and 33 had plans in development. That means 125 WHO Member States don’t have national strategies to tackle this global killer. A dramatic scale up in resources and prioritisation is vital.


The Republic of Croatia has not been officially present except M.Sc. Tatjana Reić, President Hepatos and ELPA.
This is a unique opportunity worthy of celebration. But our work does not stop here. We as a community must continue to work together to ensure that states comply with what you have committed, and to implement activities to achieve the goal of elimination by year 2030.

WHO hepatitis 2016

WHO hepatitis 2016

WHO hepatitis 2016

WHO hepatitis 2016

WHO hepatitis 2016

WHO hepatitis 2016

WHO hepatitis 2016

WHO hepatitis 2016

WHO hepatitis 2016